Millbridge Junior Infant and Nursery School

Parents  »  E-Safety

As part of the national curriculum, pupils use computers in school to access the internet and to send email.   Teaching pupils about safe use of these facilities is included as part of the curriculum. The children will be introduced to e-safety in a planned and progressive way through school, to help them understand how to keep themselves safe when using the internet and other electronic devices. We will ensure that safe use is always included when new activities are introduced to pupils.
 
As part of our commitment to their safety we always ensure that access to the internet has a valuable educational purpose and is supervised.  Internet access is provided by Kirklees through a filtered system which prevents access to the majority of undesirable material. However there is always a small chance that undesirable material can get through the filters, but we will teach the children what to do should this occur.  We will educate pupils to act responsibly on the internet and to understand some of the risks involved.
When pupils use email or other forms of electronic communication, this will always be in a carefully controlled way so that we know who pupils are in contact with.
Many children now have access to the internet outside school, some via their mobile phones. You should be aware this offers pupils much more freedom to use the internet and consequently more ready access to material and activities which might be considered unsuitable.  Pupils may also use this freedom to make contact with people they do not actually know, although they may consider them their friends, because they make contact with them on a regular basis. Pupils may also use some of these facilities (such as MSN, text messaging, cameras on mobile phones or social network sites such as Facebook) to send upsetting messages or publish things about other pupils which could count as bullying.
We will teach pupils about ‘cyberbullying’ and the danger of making contact with strangers online as part of the curriculum. We want you to know that we take any activity of this kind seriously even if it takes place outside school, as it can be seriously upsetting for the recipient.  We would contact you if an issue of this kind were to arise and would ask for your support in dealing with issues.

E-safety links for parents

think you know

CEOP

uk safer internet centre


bbc stay safe
You Tube for Children


Dive into a world of discovery, learning, and fun YouTube Kids. Made for curious little minds. YouTube Kids gives your family an easy way to watch their favourite shows, or explore anything that captures their imagination. It’s free, simple to use, and full of family-friendly videos.

For more information about YouTube Kids, including how to set up parental controls, please check out their Parent Guide. YouTube Kids Parental Guide https://support.google.com/youtubekids


The Blue Whale Game

The Police have asked that we circulate to all schools, a dangerous new game that has hit social media.The following has originated from a Police Safer Schools Officer in Leeds.

 

The Blue Whale game is a dangerous game that is popular at the moment in Russia and spreading across Eastern Europe.

 

The game is played online and spreads through social media.

 

Players are appointed a "master/teacher" and these "masters/teachers" challenge the players in stages, to tattoo a Blue Whale somewhere on the body, usually the arm or the leg. As the game goes on the players are encouraged to self-harm and the final challenge is to commit suicide.

 

All these actions have to be filmed and shared via social media to the so called "master/teacher". The game is being played by children of all ages, some as young as primary age, but predominantly by teenagers.

 

Apparently this game has been mentioned on the Romanian News due to the seriousness of the consequences.

 

This obviously sets a worrying trend and the game has already been mentioned at a school in Leeds.

 

 

 

Snapchat and Snap Map


Snapchat is an app that lets people send a photo, short video or message to your contacts. The ‘snap’ appears on screen for up to 10 seconds before disappearing, although it can be screenshotted, which means it can be saved and transferred to  a permanent file. Last week snapchat introduced a new feature, called Snap Maps.

Snap Maps lets users track each other’s movements in real time, but child safety groups are cautioning young people against sharing their location, especially when they are away from home.

ChildNet(*) have posted a thorough explanation of Snap Maps and how to ensure users stay safe, including :

1.Only share your location with people you know in person. Never share your location with strangers.
2. Don’t add contacts to Snapchat if you don’t know them in person.
3.Regularly review your settings and take an active decision about whether you want people to know your location. You can always switch this off at any time. Think about where you’re sharing your location.

Remember, minimum age for Snap chat is 13.
 

(*) http://www.childnet.com/blog/introducing-snap-maps-the-new-location-sharing-feature-in-snapchat
Other link : https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jun/23/snapchat-maps-privacy-safety-concerns